Jeremiah

Warning ● 600-580 BCE ● 52 chapters


The Book of Jeremiah is a book of the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament. It is a collection of prophecies and teachings attributed to the prophet Jeremiah, who lived in the 6th and 5th centuries BCE and served as a prophet and adviser to the kings of Judah. The Book of Jeremiah covers a wide range of subjects, including the judgment and redemption of God's people, the coming of the Messiah, and the restoration of the Kingdom of God. The book includes a number of prophecies about the Babylonian exile and the fall of the Kingdom of Judah, as well as visions of the future restoration and prosperity of the kingdom of God. Key figures in the book of Jeremiah include Jeremiah, as well as the kings of Judah, including Josiah, Jehoiakim, and Zedekiah. The book also mentions various other individuals, such as the Babylonians, the Persians, and the Messiah, who are the subjects of the prophet's teachings and prophecies. The book also includes a number of references to God and his actions, as well as expressions of trust and reliance on him.



The book of Jeremiah is one of the major prophetic books of the Old Testament. It is traditionally attributed to the prophet Jeremiah, who lived in the 7th century BC. The book is divided into two parts: the first part is a collection of prophecies, and the second part is a narrative of the prophet's life and ministry. The book begins with a call to Jeremiah to be a prophet to the nations. He is told to proclaim God's message of judgment and warning to the people of Judah and Jerusalem. Throughout the book, Jeremiah speaks out against the sins of the people, warning them of the consequences of their disobedience. He also speaks of God's mercy and promises of restoration if the people will repent and turn back to Him. The second part of the book is a narrative of Jeremiah's life and ministry. It tells of his struggles with the people of Judah and Jerusalem, and his attempts to lead them back to God. It also tells of his suffering and exile, and his eventual return to Jerusalem. The book of Jeremiah is an important book in the Bible, as it speaks of God's judgment and mercy, and of the need for repentance and faith. It is a reminder to us of the importance of obedience to God and of the consequences of disobedience. It is also a reminder of God's faithfulness and His promises of restoration and hope.


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Key characters in Jeremiah


Jeremiah

Judah

Josiah

Jehoiakim

Zedekiah

Babylonians

Persians

Messiah

Nebuchadnezzar

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In Jeremiah 1, God calls Jeremiah to be a prophet to the nations. Despite his feelings of inadequacy and youthfulness, God reassures Jeremiah that He will be with him and give him the words to speak. The chapter ends with God touching Jeremiah's mouth and appointing him as a prophet.

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In Jeremiah 2, God accuses the people of Israel of backsliding and turning away from Him. Despite His love and faithfulness, they have abandoned Him for false gods and committed various sins. God appeals to the people to remember their relationship with Him and to repent before it's too late.

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In Jeremiah chapter 3, God calls on His people, Israel, to return to Him, despite their unfaithfulness and idolatry. He pleads with them to admit their wrongdoing and turn away from their sin, promising to forgive and restore them if they do. God's heart is full of longing for His people to come back to Him and experience His love and faithfulness.

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In Jeremiah chapter 4, the prophet issues a call to repentance to the people of Judah, warning of impending destruction if they refuse to turn from their wicked ways. He describes the coming judgement as a devastating storm, warning the people to take refuge and mend their ways before it is too late.

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In Jeremiah chapter 5, God addresses the sinful ways of the people of Judah. He describes their disobedience and refusal to repent, even after sending prophets to warn them. God questions if there is anyone in the land who seeks righteousness, but finds that even the religious leaders are corrupt. As a result, God declares that he will bring judgement upon the people through foreign invaders.

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Jeremiah warns the people of Jerusalem about the impending destruction that will come upon them if they continue in their ways of disobedience towards God. He describes the enemy army from the north as relentless and merciless, and encourages the people to repent and turn back to God before it’s too late.

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God speaks through prophet Jeremiah, condemning the hypocritical worship of the people of Judah. Despite their offerings and sacrifices, they continue to engage in wickedness and fail to show justice and kindness to others.

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Jeremiah chapter 8 continues the prophet's warning to the people of Judah about their impending doom. He emphasizes the consequences of their rejection of God and their refusal to repent. The chapter ends with a cry of lament for the destruction that is about to come.

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In Jeremiah chapter 9, the prophet laments over the sin and faithlessness of the people of Judah. He warns them of the coming judgment and encourages them to repent and turn back to God.

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In Jeremiah chapter 10, the prophet warns against the worship of idols made by human hands. He describes the futility of seeking blessings from lifeless objects, and contrasts it with the majesty and power of the true God. He exhorts the people of Israel to turn away from their idolatrous ways and return to the worship of the living God.

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In chapter 11 of the book of Jeremiah, God speaks to the prophet about the broken covenant between Him and His people. He reminds them of the covenant made at Horeb and how they failed to obey it. God warns of the consequences for their disobedience, but the people refuse to listen.

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In Jeremiah 12, the prophet questions why the wicked prosper while the righteous suffer. God responds by reminding Jeremiah of His ultimate plan for justice and encouraging him to trust in His sovereignty. The chapter ends with a warning to Israel to turn from their wicked ways and repent before it's too late.

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In Jeremiah 13, God instructs the prophet to buy a linen sash and wear it without washing it. He then tells him to hide it in a crevice of a rock by the Euphrates River. Later, God tells Jeremiah to retrieve the sash, but it has become ruined and worthless. This serves as a metaphor for how the people of Judah have become corrupt and useless in their unfaithfulness to God.

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In Jeremiah 14, the prophet laments the severe drought plaguing Judah and Jerusalem. He cries out to God for mercy and intercedes on behalf of the people. However, God reveals that their sins have caused their suffering and warns them of impending judgment.

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In Jeremiah chapter 15, the prophet laments to God about the persecution and rejection he faces from his people. God responds, stating that he will not tolerate their continued disobedience and promises to punish them severely. However, he also reassures Jeremiah that he will be protected and strengthened during these trials.

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In Jeremiah chapter 16, God instructs Jeremiah not to marry or have children as a sign of the upcoming judgment on Judah. The people's continued idolatry will result in severe consequences, including death, famine, and exile. Despite the impending doom, God promises restoration and a future for His chosen people.

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Jeremiah 17 exposes the wickedness of man's heart, and warns against relying on one's own strength instead of trusting in God. It also promises God's blessings for those who trust in Him.

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In Jeremiah chapter 18, God instructs Jeremiah to visit a potter's house where he witnesses the potter molding and shaping clay on the potter's wheel. God then reveals that, like the pottery, He can shape and mold Israel as He sees fit, and warns of impending judgment if they continue in their disobedience.

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In Jeremiah chapter 19, the prophet is commanded by God to take a clay jar and go to the valley of Ben Hinnom. There, he is to proclaim that the people of Judah have forsaken God and will suffer grave consequences, including being so devastated that their bodies will be left unburied. Jeremiah then smashes the jar as a sign of the destruction that will come upon the people.

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In Jeremiah chapter 20, we see the continuation of Jeremiah's persecution by Pashhur, a priest, for prophesying against Jerusalem. Pashhur has Jeremiah beaten and put in stocks, but Jeremiah continues to speak the word of the Lord. Jeremiah offers a prayer of lament to God, expressing his frustration and anger towards his persecutors, but ultimately acknowledging God's sovereignty and his own dedication to following Him.

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In Jeremiah 21, King Zedekiah sends messengers to the prophet Jeremiah to inquire about the outcome of an impending Babylonian invasion. Jeremiah's response is that the invasion is a result of the people's rejection of God's covenant and His warning to repent. The chapter also includes a warning to the king and his officials of their impending downfall if they do not turn to God.

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Jeremiah delivers a message from God to the kings of Judah, urging them to rule justly and warning of the consequences of their disobedience. The chapter highlights the importance of leadership and the responsibility that comes with holding power.

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In Jeremiah 23, God rebukes the corrupt leaders of Judah and promises to send a righteous king to rule over His people. The chapter also warns against false prophets who deceive the people with lies.

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In Jeremiah Chapter 24, the prophet is shown a vision of two baskets of figs presented before the Lord. One basket holds good figs, while the other holds bad figs. The Lord explains that the good figs represent the exiles from Judah who have been taken into Babylonian captivity, whom He promises to restore and bring back to their land. The bad figs represent the wicked king Zedekiah and his officials, who will suffer destruction and exile.

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In Jeremiah 25, God pronounces judgment on Judah and the surrounding nations for their sins and unfaithfulness. Jeremiah is instructed to proclaim a message of judgment and call for repentance, warning of impending destruction and exile. God will punish these nations for their idolatry and violence, using Babylon as his instrument of judgment.

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In chapter 26 of the book of Jeremiah, the prophet delivers a warning message from God to the people of Judah. Speaking in the temple, Jeremiah urges the people of the city to repent of their evil ways, or else face the destruction of the temple and the city itself.

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In Jeremiah 27, God instructs Jeremiah to make a yoke and put it on his neck as a symbol of submission to the Babylonian Empire. God tells the neighboring nations through Jeremiah to submit to Babylon, serve their king and they will be allowed to remain in their lands. Those who refuse to submit will face destruction.

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In Jeremiah chapter 28, a false prophet named Hananiah challenges Jeremiah's prophecies by predicting that the Babylonian captivity will only last two years. But Jeremiah responds by reminding Hananiah and the people of Israel that true prophecy comes from God alone and that Hananiah's message is a lie. Later, Hananiah dies, and Jeremiah's prophecies prove true as the Babylonian captivity lasts for 70 years.

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In chapter 29 of the book of Jeremiah, God sends a message to the exiles in Babylon through the prophet Jeremiah. He tells them that although they are far from their homeland and in a difficult situation, they are not forgotten. God has a plan for them that will prosper them and not harm them, giving them hope and a future. However, they must seek Him and look to Him with all their heart to be able to receive His blessings.

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In Jeremiah chapter 30, God speaks to the prophet about the coming restoration of His people after a time of judgment and exile. He promises to bring them back to their land, to heal them of their wounds, and to establish a new covenant with them. God also warns the nations who have mistreated Israel that judgment is coming upon them.

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In Jeremiah 31, God speaks through the prophet Jeremiah to promise a new covenant with his people. This covenant will not be like the old covenant which the people broke, but it will be one that is written on their hearts, forgiveness will be offered, and peace will be established.

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In Jeremiah 32, God commands the prophet to buy a field in his hometown of Anathoth, even though it was currently under Babylonian siege. Jeremiah obeys and records the transaction, signifying that despite the current destruction and exile, the land would one day be restored to its rightful owners.

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In Jeremiah 33, God speaks to the prophet about the restoration of Jerusalem. Despite the city being besieged and its people taken captive, God promises to bring health and healing, rebuild the city and the temple, and fill it with joy and praise. God will also establish a new covenant with His people, and the city will once again flourish.

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In Jeremiah chapter 34, the Lord commands Jeremiah to speak to the leaders of Judah regarding their broken covenant with him. The rulers had made a covenant with God to release their Hebrew slaves after six years, but had violated this agreement by forcing them to remain enslaved. The Lord warns that, because of their disobedience, they will suffer the consequences of their actions and be punished for their sins.

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In Jeremiah 35, God commands Jeremiah to bring the Rechabites, a group of nomadic people, to the temple to offer them wine. However, the Rechabites refuse to drink wine or live in houses, as part of their ancestor's instructions. God commends their faithfulness to their ancestor's commandments and contrasts it with Judah's disobedience to God's commandments.

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In Jeremiah chapter 36, God commands Jeremiah to write down all the prophecies he had spoken against Judah and its kings. Jeremiah dictates the message to Baruch, his scribe, who reads it aloud to the people in the temple. The officials take the scroll to King Jehoiakim, who has it burned page by page. However, God promises to write a new message of judgment against Jehoiakim and his nation.

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In Jeremiah 37, King Zedekiah sends two officials to Jeremiah to inquire about the outcome of the Babylonian siege. Jeremiah prophesies that the Babylonians will capture Jerusalem and advises the officials to surrender. The officials report back to the king, but he does not listen and instead has Jeremiah arrested and put in prison.

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In Jeremiah chapter 38, we see the prophet's continued persecution by the officials of Judah for prophesying against the city. They throw him into a cistern to die, but a courageous Ethiopian eunuch rescues him with the help of King Zedekiah. Despite the king's secret support for Jeremiah, he remains imprisoned and continues to warn against the impending destruction of Jerusalem.

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In Jeremiah chapter 39, Babylonian forces capture Jerusalem and burn down the temple. King Zedekiah attempts to flee but is caught and brought before King Nebuchadnezzar. Nebuchadnezzar orders the execution of Zedekiah's sons in front of him before blinding him and taking him to Babylon along with many other captives.

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After the fall of Jerusalem to the Babylonians, the Babylonian captain, Nebuzaradan, appointed Gedaliah as governor over Judah. Gedaliah encouraged the people to stay in Judah, promising safety and prosperity under Babylonian rule. However, Ishmael, a member of the royal family, assassinated Gedaliah, causing chaos and fear among the people.

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In Jeremiah 41, Ishmael conspires with ten other men to assassinate Gedaliah, who had been appointed as governor over Judah by the Babylonians after the fall of Jerusalem. They also killed the Babylonian soldiers who were with him and many others. Johanan then leads a group of soldiers to pursue Ishmael and his men, ultimately leading to a great battle.

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In Jeremiah chapter 42, a group of Judean leaders asks the prophet to pray for guidance from God regarding whether they should stay in Judah under Babylonian rule or flee to Egypt. Jeremiah agrees to seek God's direction and promises to faithfully relay His answer. After ten days, God responds, warning the people not to go to Egypt, lest they suffer disaster and death.

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In Jeremiah chapter 43, the prophet warns the people of Judah not to flee to Egypt to escape the Babylonians, as it goes against God's will. However, they refuse to listen and insist on going to Egypt, taking Jeremiah with them. In Egypt, they continue to worship false gods, but Jeremiah reminds them that their disobedience led to the destruction of Jerusalem and that God's judgment will follow them.

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In Jeremiah 44, the prophet confronts the people of Judah who had fled to Egypt after the Babylonian invasion. He admonishes them for their persistent idolatry and warns of dire consequences if they do not repent and turn to God. The people, however, refuse to listen and insist on continuing their worship of other gods.

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In Jeremiah chapter 45, Baruch, Jeremiah's faithful scribe, expresses his discouragement amidst the turmoil of Judah. God responds by comforting Baruch and assuring him of his protection amid the judgment that is coming upon the nation.

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In Jeremiah chapter 46, God instructs the prophet to speak a message of judgment against Egypt. A great invasion by the Babylonian army is foretold, and the godless Egyptians are warned that their pride and faith in false gods will be their downfall. Amidst the chaos and devastation, the Lord promises to not leave His people Israel unprotected and to eventually restore them.

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Jeremiah prophesies the downfall of the Philistines, traditional foes of Israel. The chapter depicts the Philistines as helpless against the wrath of the Lord, who sends Babylonians to destroy them.

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In Jeremiah 48, God speaks through the prophet Jeremiah to deliver a prophecy of judgment against Moab, a nearby nation known for their arrogance and pride. The prophecy outlines the destruction that God will bring upon Moab, likening it to the devastation left by a natural disaster. The chapter also includes a call to repentance for Moab and a promise of mercy if they turn away from their sinful ways and worship the true God.

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In Jeremiah chapter 49, the prophet receives prophecies from God regarding several nations neighboring Israel, including Ammon, Edom, Damascus, Kedar, and Elam. These prophecies warn of impending judgment and destruction for their wickedness and pride.

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Jeremiah prophesied the downfall of Babylon and the restoration of God's people. Babylon, once a powerful nation, will face destruction for its sins and arrogance. The Lord will bring a remnant of Israel back to their homeland and bless them with prosperity.

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In Jeremiah chapter 51, the prophet delivers a message of judgment against Babylon. He foretells its destruction and the overthrow of its idols. He calls on the nations to join forces against Babylon and to spoil it, as it had done to other nations. The chapter ends with the repetition of the certainty of Babylon's fall.

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Jeremiah 52 recounts the fall of Jerusalem and the captivity of Judah at the hands of Babylon. The chapter outlines the destruction of Jerusalem's walls and buildings, the capture and execution of King Zedekiah, and the deportation of the remaining people to Babylon.

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FAQ

How long does it take to read the whole book of Jeremiah?

Assuming a reader with an average reading speed of 300 WPM reads the Book of Jeremiah,it would take approximately 54 minutes to finish.

How many verses and chapters does the book of Jeremiah have?

There are 1364 verses in the book of Jeremiah, which is organized into 52 chapters.

When did the book of Jeremiah take place?

The book of Jeremiah was written within the range of 600-580 BCE.

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